Project Cycle Management

Blog: Read India - When ‘Scale’ Met ‘System’

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This post is about how Sukhpreet Sekhon and his team set up a measurement system for a large scale education initiative that stretched across 15 states in India reaching half a million children.

The need for institutional change in capacity development of tertiary agricultural education

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Authors: Mundie Salm, Gerard Baltissen, Richard Hawkins, Jifke Sol, Ruud Ludemann, Anouka van Eerdewijk, Mariana Wongtschowski, Driek Enserink and Marlene Roefs.

Publication date: October 2014

A Guide for Developing a Logical Framework

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Author: Centre for International Development and Training 

The Logical Framework is a tool to help strengthen project design, implementation and evaluation. This guide helps to develop and use a Logical Framework.

Budgeting in the real world: 2013 CAPE conference report

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Author: Welham, B. (for ODI)
Publication date: 2014

​The 2013 CAPE Conference on ‘budgeting in the real world’ took place on the 13 and 14 of November in London and was broadcast live online.

The focus was on real-life issues facing budget managers, and their supporters, as they develop, execute and report on national expenditure plans.

Results management in norwegian development cooperation: A practical guide

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Author: Norad
Publication date: 2008

Findings from Management Reviews of Norwegian development cooperation reveal a need and a demand for a practical introduction to the main concepts, principles and especially tools of results management. This short guide is an attempt to respond to that demand, the purpose being to increase staff’s knowledge of the main principles of results and risk management and what it means in practical terms throughout the various stages of programme management.

A guide for managing projects and programmes in the face of complexity

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Authors: Hummelbrunner, R. & Jones, H.
Publication date: 2013

Complexity heightens the importance of effective management, but poses challenges for the tools and approaches used most widely to manage international development projects.

This ODI guide, which follows 'A guide to planning and strategy development in the face of complexity', addresses the challenges managers face steering development interventions towards their intended goals in the face of three types of challenges:

A guide for planning and strategy development in the face of complexity

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Authors: Hummelbrunner, R. & Jones, H.
Publication date: 2013

This Background Note is a guide, explaining how planning and strategy development can be carried out despite complexity. While it is true that complex situations require a greater focus on learning and adaptation, this does not render plan­ning irrelevant.

A guide for planning and strategy development in the face of complexity

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Authors: Hummelbrunner, R. & Jones, H.
Publication date: 2013

This Background Note is a guide, explaining how planning and strategy development can be carried out despite complexity. While it is true that complex situations require a greater focus on learning and adaptation, this does not render plan­ning irrelevant.

A guide for managing projects and programmes in the face of complexity

- 0 comments

Authors: Hummelbrunner, R. & Jones, H.
Publication date: 2013

Complexity heightens the importance of effective management, but poses challenges for the tools and approaches used most widely to manage international development projects.

This ODI guide, which follows 'A guide to planning and strategy development in the face of complexity', addresses the challenges managers face steering development interventions towards their intended goals in the face of three types of challenges:

How Feedback Loops Can Improve Aid (and Maybe Governance)

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Author: Whittle, D. (for the Center for Global Development)
Publication Date: 2013

If private markets can produce the iPhone, why can’t aid organizations create and implement development initiatives that are equally innovative and sought after by people around the world? The key difference is feedback loops. Well-functioning private markets excel at providing consumers with a constantly improving stream of high-quality products and services. Why? Because consumers give companies constant feedback on what they like and what they don’t.